Tag Archives: Virginia Press Association

DINNER WITH FOXES & CONFEDERATE MONEY

By Harry Covert

I always chuckle hearing the old line, “Save yore Confederate money boys, the South’s gonna rise again.”  Andy Griffith made that famous.

For years as a gag, I had fun using $100 confederate bills as a notepad, long before we had the joy of electronic mail. It felt good using first-class U.S. stamps especially to those Yankee carpetbaggers who invaded the Commonwealth for fame, fortune and good living.

So, now we are in the sesquicentennial commemoration of what many still refer to as the War of Northern Aggression or the War Between the States.  A history buff can really get involved with all of the “celebrations” scheduled through 2015.… Read More

A New Meaning for Citizen-Soldiers

For years, like lots of people, I’ve driven up-and-down Virginia’s highways glancing at roadsigns acknowledging the famed 29th Division Infantry Division. I’ve seen a movie or two about the Fighting 29th. I know about the national memorial in Bedford, Virginia. I’ve even known men who fought in the unit. I’ve heard stories of those who died on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day.

Nothing has been as riveting as reading Christian Davenport’s book, As You Were, To War and Back with the Black Hawk Battalion of the Virginia National Guard. This is a well-written, powerful book of a one-year experience of this Washington Post reporter embedded with the Virginia National Guard.… Read More

Day in the Newsroom: Real Heroes

I celebrated the 65th anniversary of the D-Day Landing last weekend watching the Foyle’s War episode, “All Clear,” the great British TV show. I often take time to remember the Greatest Generation by re-reading or re-watching “Patton,” “The Saving of Private Ryan” or “Action in the North Atlantic,” the latter a wonderful film about the U. S. Merchant Marine.

One of my uncles, Johnny Davis, served in the Merchant Marine. He loved ships and the sea. He told me how it was to be sunk by Nazi U-boats. “You’d only want to do it once,” he’d laugh. “The Germans always struck us at night when it was cold and the water freezing.” The first time for him was “at dark 0230.” He was 19.… Read More